Saturday, March 04, 2006

PROGRESSIVE BOOK CLUB LIST

GENERAL (CORE) READING

Alperovitz, Gar, America Beyond Capitalism: Reclaiming Our Wealth, Our Liberty, and Our Democracy (John Wiley & Sons, 2005).

Korten, David C., When Corporations Rule the World (Berrett-Koehler, 2001)

Peery, Nelson, The Future Is Up to Us: A Revolutionary Talking Politics with the American People (Speakers for a New America, 2002),

Paul Rogat Loeb,, The Impossible Will Take a Little While: A Citizen's Guide to Hope in a Time of Fear (Basic Books, 2004)


GLOBALIZATION (NEO-LIBERALISM)

Faux, Jeff, The Global Class War: How America’s Bipartisan Elite Lost Our Future and What It Will Take to Win It Back (Wiley, 2006). [Haven’t read this. Just out. Sounds intriguing.]

Friedman, Tom, The World Is Flat: A Brief History of the 21st Century (Farrar, Strauss, & Giroux, 2003). [Haven't read this, either, but it's on everybody else's list.]

Hartmann, Thom, Unequal Protection: The Rise of Corporate Dominance and the Theft of Human Rights (2002)

Perkins, John, Confessions of an Economic Hit Man (Berrett-Koehler, 2004).

Saul, John Ralston, The Collapse of Globalism and the Reinvention of the World (Viking Canada, 2005)

Stiglitz, Joseph E., Globalization and Its Discontents (paperback, 2003)


RESOURCE WARS

Klare, Michael T., Resource Wars: The New Landscape of Global Conflict (Henry Holt & Co., 2002).

Klare, Michael T., Blood and Oil: The Dangers and Consequences of America's Growing Dependency on Imported Petroleum (Henry Holt & Co., 2005).


U.S. HISTORY

Peter Ackerman, Jack Duvall, A Force More Powerful: A Century of Nonviolent Conflict (Oct. 2001)

Counter, Stephanie, The Way We Never Were (about the American family), 1992, Basic Books

Zinn, Howard, A People's History of the United States: 1492-Present



US COMMON FOLK

Ehrenreich, Barbara, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America (Henry Holt & Co., 2001).

Shipler, David K., The Working Poor: Invisible in America (Alfred A. Knoph, 2004).

Warren, Elizabeth and Amelia Warren Tyagi, The Two-Income Trap: Why Middle-Class Parents Are Going Broke (Basic Books, 2003).

Wolman, William and Anne Colamosca, The Great 401(k) Hoax: Why Your Family’s Financial Security Is at Risk, and What You Can Do About It (Basic Books, 2003).


RELIGION AND POLITICS

Wallis, Jim, God's Politics: Why the Right Gets It Wrong and the Left Doesn't Get It (HarperCollins, 2005)


GLOBALIZATION AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Enough : Staying Human in an Engineered Age (Paperback)
by Bill McKibben
Product Details
Paperback: 288 pages
Publisher: Owl Books (February 1, 2004)
Language: English
ISBN: 0805075194

Collapse : How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed (Paperback)
by Jared Diamond
Product Details
Paperback: 592 pages
Publisher: Penguin (Non-Classics) (December 27, 2005)
Language: English
ISBN: 0143036556

3 Comments:

Blogger newsaintnews said...

Do Clones Have Souls", is a book that is short and entertaining enough for the masses and evolved enough for the astute reader. Do Clones Have Souls is a work of fiction rich in political discourse. The issues of our time are addressed using a group that is universally despised. They are spurned by the church who call thier existence an abomination.The Supreme rules that they have no rights. The media instead of being a catalyst for their freedom, exploit them for ratings.
The Clones are used as soldiers in three wars,for organ transplants,as servants and sex slaves.
Blacks, illegal immigrants, Gays and the poor see no relationship between their issues and those of Clones. The Clones form a small resistance movement and are immediately labeled terrorists....
The central characters are amazing and the plot twists are fasinating and unexpected. This a book written for our time and beyond.Do ClONES Have Souls is available at Amazon.com. Contact the author Herb Wright at moralminority1@msn.com.

9:55 PM  
Blogger newsaintnews said...

The Craving and the Cross by Herbert Wright is a bold political thriller. The villain is a CEO who has achieved incredible financial success. He lives without limits. Beautiful women submit to his desires and men want to be like him. He lives an enviable life of power, passion and intrigue. He appears to have achieved his every desire but feels unfulfilled. He cannot accept aging, death and the eventual loss of his wealth and power. His greed will not allow him to die. He is approaching age forty and has become consumed with finding the key to immortality.



Our hero Joe is a homeless man, who loves virtue and believes that God speaks to him. He tries to share his wisdom with anyone who will listen but swarms of people ignore him as they busily rush to work. One day Joe is standing across the street from a bank when two men exit. Both men have taken a hostage. They have their guns drawn and their arms around the women’s necks. He crosses the street, moving quickly toward the gunmen. The first gunman fires, he misses twice. Joe continues to move toward them. The second man fires. His gun jams. He throws it at Joe it misses him. The gun goes off as it hits the ground. The bullet shatters a glass window as Joe continues to move forward. The gunmen hear sirens. The hostages wiggle free and the men run to their car. An Anchorman at the scene of the robbery interviews Joe. He becomes a media sensation. Many viewers speculate that Joe may be the world’s next savior, an authentic hero who can perform miracles. Others say he is a schizophrenic and a heretic. His harshest critics are from Wolf News, one of the companies owned by the villainous CEO. He fears Joe’s message and thinks it antithetical to mindless consumption that his businesses require. He tries to destroy our hero until he discovers that Joe is a key to his quest for immortality.

11:45 PM  
Blogger newsaintnews said...

The Craving and the Cross by Herbert Wright is a bold political thriller. The villain is a CEO who has achieved incredible financial success. He lives without limits. Beautiful women submit to his desires and men want to be like him. He lives an enviable life of power, passion and intrigue. He appears to have achieved his every desire but feels unfulfilled. He cannot accept aging, death and the eventual loss of his wealth and power. His greed will not allow him to die. He is approaching age forty and has become consumed with finding the key to immortality.



Our hero Joe is a homeless man, who loves virtue and believes that God speaks to him. He tries to share his wisdom with anyone who will listen but swarms of people ignore him as they busily rush to work. One day Joe is standing across the street from a bank when two men exit. Both men have taken a hostage. They have their guns drawn and their arms around the women’s necks. He crosses the street, moving quickly toward the gunmen. The first gunman fires, he misses twice. Joe continues to move toward them. The second man fires. His gun jams. He throws it at Joe it misses him. The gun goes off as it hits the ground. The bullet shatters a glass window as Joe continues to move forward. The gunmen hear sirens. The hostages wiggle free and the men run to their car. An Anchorman at the scene of the robbery interviews Joe. He becomes a media sensation. Many viewers speculate that Joe may be the world’s next savior, an authentic hero who can perform miracles. Others say he is a schizophrenic and a heretic. His harshest critics are from Wolf News, one of the companies owned by the villainous CEO. He fears Joe’s message and thinks it antithetical to mindless consumption that his businesses require. He tries to destroy our hero until he discovers that Joe is a key to his quest for immortality.

11:46 PM  

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